Critics are already missing the point of this refreshing after school special style 90s trope laden TV show that was just released on Netflix

Lately, critics all over the web seem to think that everything that is produced by Netflix has to meet an optimal standard set by critics, but that just isn’t the reality. The truth is that a good TV show is one that makes you want to watch it through to the end, and that’s exactly how I felt when watching Everything Sucks! that was just released a few days ago.

Everything Sucks isn’t Stranger Things, nor is it Freaks and Geeks. It’s not meant to be, nor should it be taken as such. And when critics say things like, “TV needs to stop living in the past,” you can rest assured that is simply the critics’ way of saying they were bored, and I don’t blame them. If you’re a television critic, you’ve probably seen it all. But the reality is that the majority of Americans are not TV critics, they’re consumers. And if you’re in your late 30s, early 40s right now, then you probably remember the 1990s very clearly but don’t really think about the decade all that much. Whether or not you miss the 90s is irrelevant when a song you haven’t heard fortwo decades comes on. Suddenly, you are thrown into a mood that you may not have felt for so long that it feels nothing less than refreshing.

But the real gem inside this show isn’t the nostalgia, it’s the message. The 1990s were full of after-school specials that taught us moral lessons that were hard to forget since the same lessons were being taught in school across America and often in our own homes. The suburbanite single parent was now a common occurrence, being yourself was more important than being who everyone wanted you to be, and finding extra curricular activities that weren’t solely centered around doing drugs and nothing else was key. The drama club and A/V club were where the geeks ended up because their parents knew they were the future “cool” kids. Parents of the 90s had started a trend of not forcing their kids to conform to societal norms the way they had grown up in the 70s. Parents in the 90s were more concerned that their kids were happy than they were that they were successful, a trend that was absurd by Baby-boomer standards but is now the norm.

What sets this show apart from a show like Freaks and Geeks, for example, is that the freaks and geeks in Everything Sucks prevail. It may not be what really happened for a lot of America’s 90s outcasts, but it sure is what the majority of them wanted. And when you’re watching a nostalgic sitcom, isn’t good feelings what we want?